Laurie Sullivan | Webster Real Estate, Dudley Real Estate, Oxford Real Estate


A home seller must consider the initial asking price of his or her residence closely. Because if a home seller sets an unrealistic initial asking price, he or she risks alienating potential buyers.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you set a realistic initial asking price for your house.

1. Review the Local Housing Market

The local housing market may favor buyers or sellers. Fortunately, if you analyze the local housing sector, you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's market – or vice-versa – and price your house accordingly.

In a buyer's market, there is an abundance of quality residences and a shortage of buyers. And if you're operating in a buyer's market, you may need to price your house aggressively to stir up interest in it.

Comparatively, in a seller's market, there is a shortage of quality residences and an abundance of buyers. In a seller's market, you may be able to generate lots of interest in your house, even if you set an above-average price for it.

Regardless of whether you're operating in a buyer's or seller's market, you should assess housing sector data. Find out how your residence stacks up against available houses in your city or town that are similar to your own. Then, you may be better equipped than ever before to set a competitive initial asking price for your home.

2. Conduct a Home Inspection and Appraisal

By performing a home inspection, you can receive comprehensive insights into your house's condition. Following an inspection, you can prioritize home repairs. Plus, you can use an inspection report to help you determine how to price your residence.

In addition, you can conduct a home appraisal prior to listing your residence. Thanks to an appraisal, you can receive a property valuation. And as a result, you can use this property valuation to price your house appropriately.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of the housing market. Thus, he or she can help you establish the right price for your house.

Ultimately, a real estate agent is unafraid to be honest with a house seller. He or she will teach a seller about the housing market and provide unbiased recommendations about how to price a residence. Best of all, a real estate agent will promote a house to prospective buyers and ensure a seller can get the best price for his or her home.

Let's not forget about the assistance that a real estate agent can provide during a negotiation, either. A real estate agent is happy to negotiate with a buyer on your behalf. As such, a real estate agent can help you optimize your house sale earnings.

For a home seller who wants to determine the right price for his or her house, it helps to prepare as much as possible. If you take advantage of the aforementioned tips, you can establish a competitive initial asking price for your home and boost the likelihood of enjoying a fast, profitable house selling experience.


Finding the house of your dreams is a process that requires a lot of clarity, diligence, and patience. While it is possible for the first house you look at to be the ideal choice, it's a lot more likely you'll have to look at a dozen or more houses before finding the one that matches your requirements and feels like home.

Whether you're searching for your first home or your tenth, your decision will primarily be based on four factors: affordability, practicality, emotional appeal, and prevailing market conditions.

Affordability is a vital element in the mix because it's difficult to enjoy a beautiful new home if you're always stressed out about whether you'll be able to make the next mortgage payment! Developing a realistic and well thought-out budget is one of the first preliminary steps involved in launching a full-fledged search for your next home. In addition to being able to cover your current expenses and the cost of mortgage payments, you'll also want to ensure that there's a cushion in your budget for things like home maintenance, repairs, improvements, HOA fees (if applicable), property taxes, school taxes, and homeowner's insurance.

As far as practicality goes, your new home should -- at the very least -- live up to your basic needs and expectations. Ideally, all systems should work properly and be in good condition. Proximity to key locations, such as your job, shopping, and essential services can also have a direct impact on your quality of life. Long commutes, cramped quarters, or being buried by an avalanche of repair bills can definitely take some of the pleasure out of home ownership!

The majority of houses you'll look at will probably need some degree of updating, decorating, or repairs, but ideally, you'll want to tackle those projects over the next couple of years, rather than the immediate future! Having an experienced home inspector do a thorough inspection of the home you're interested in will help ensure you're not buying a home riddled with flaws, headaches waiting to happen, and other problems.

Although cost and practicality are vital aspects of buying a new home, you can't (and wouldn't want to) ignore factors such as aesthetics and emotional appeal. If you can't imagine you and your family living in and enjoying a house you're considering buying, it might be time to continue your search elsewhere! The house you ultimately choose should support your lifestyle, provide sufficient space for your family to grow and thrive, and be situated in a neighborhood in which you feel comfortable and safe.

To make the most of your available time and money, find an experienced real estate agent who's responsive to your needs and knowledgeable about the local real estate market. They will help you streamline your search, find houses that meet your criteria and negotiate the best possible price on your behalf.


Buying a home may seem like a smart financial move. However, it may not always be the right time or the right move for you. While buying a home is a great investment, you may not be ready to buy a home of your own. The following questions should help you to determine whether or not you are fully ready to buy a house in the near future.


How Much Money Do You Make? How Much Have You Saved?


buying a home is a significant expense. First, you’ll need quite a large sum of money for a downpayment and closing costs on the home. Second, to get approved for a mortgage, the lender will look at every part of your finances from your income to your assets. Once the home is purchased, you’ll also need quite a bit of capital for expenses including insurance, taxes, HOA fees, emergency funds, utilities, and furniture. You don’t want to buy a home only to be overwhelmed with costs. You want enough of a financial cushion to enable you to furnish your home, decorate your home, and not have a completely empty bank account. That’s why you should make sure that you do make enough money to buy a home.



How Much Debt Do You Have?


If you have established that your income is enough to buy a home, the next thing that you need to establish is that your debt isn’t too high. Before you enter into the adventure of homeownership, you’ll need to make sure that your bills are under control. These expenses include things like car loans, student loans, and credit card bills. Your lender will put your debt into consideration as a part of your entire financial picture. Your debt (including your proposed mortgage payment) should be less than around 36% of your gross income. Before you take the leap into buying a home, you’ll need to make sure that your debt is under control. If you need to take a step back and pay your bills down before you start house hunting, you should as it will make buying a home easier for you.


Are You Seasoned At Your Job?


In order to secure a mortgage for a home, you’ll need to show that you have been at the same job for a certain period of time. Your average income will probably be calculated based on how long you have been at the company and your job history. You should be able to explain any income gaps, changes in positions or companies. Otherwise, you’ll appear to be an unstable person to lend to. Lenders want to know that you’ll have a steady, stable income.


How Is Your Credit?


In order to secure a mortgage, you’ll need to have a good credit score. Check on your credit report when you begin thinking about buying a home. If your credit is on the low side, you’ll want to work on bringing that score up. 


     


Buying a home tops your long-range goals list, but are you ready? As a first-time buyer, you have loads of questions and concerns. After all, a home loan is an obligation for years into the future. You want to make savvy decisions and be comfortable that you’ve negotiated the best deal. On top of that, learning all about credit scores, how to pre-qualify and the difference between pre-qualification and pre-approval. And what are options and closing costs?

Fannie Mae, the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) government-sponsored enterprise (GSE) that serves the mortgage industry, knows what you need to know about buying a house. They’ve put together a course for new homebuyers called HomePath Ready Buyer Education Program.

Enroll now

The online course lets you attend from the comfort of your sofa. After completion, a “graduate” may qualify for assistance up to three percent of the closing cost of purchasing a qualified HomePath property. You won’t end up with an education loan either. Tuition is just $75, and Fannie Mae says it could even reimburse your tuition during closing on your new home. Now that’s a deal!

What you learn

Because the course design has new buyers in mind, you’ll learn to determine how much you can afford to buy and ways to figure out what home is best for you. Making the deal and learning about down-payment options will get you on your way. Finally, you’ll learn to avoid the pitfalls, and all the navigate the paperwork required to close the deal.

How long does it take?

The entire course is nine 30-minute sessions, so along with the quiz at the end (no final exam though), the total class takes about four to five hours. Designed to be intuitive and self-directed, you can work your way through the course over a few evenings, on your lunch hour, or even during your morning commute (provided you’re not the driver, of course!).

How you benefit

In addition to the three percent closing cost assistance and tuition reimbursement, your Certificate of Completion may qualify you up to take advantage of the First Look program. By giving first-time homeowners an exclusive "first look" at newly-listed foreclosed properties, this innovative program serves new home seekers and promotes neighborhood stabilization.

Fannie Mae relies on real estate professionals to follow through on the home-buying process. For more information, express your interest in the HomePath program to your real estate professional.


This Single-Family in Dudley, MA recently sold for $229,000. This Raised Ranch style home was sold by Laurie Sullivan - Hope Real Estate Group, Inc.


7 Delaney Ave, Dudley, MA 01571

Single-Family

$249,900
Price
$229,000
Sale Price

6
Rooms
3
Beds
2
Baths
Large 1 owner Raised Ranch in a quiet neighborhood. Vinyl sided, new roof , newer windows ,2 car garage. Finished lower level with fireplace. Sun filled living and dinning rooms , eat in kitchen. Great yard for fun and games all year long .

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